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Pontiac Grand Prix Starts And Soon Dies

Q. Vince: Hi, I am in trouble and need help. I have a:

  • 1990 Pontiac Grand Prix LE
  • 3.1 liter SFI V-6
  • Automatic transmission
  • 175,000 miles
  • P/S, A/C, Cruise control
Pontiac Grand Prix Starts And Soon Dies

It's my only car and I live in the woods 10 miles from the nearest town. The car in the past has run fine and I change the oil every 3,000 miles. The power steering pump leaks a bit and the fuel tank developed a small leak at the rear seam. The car ran fine until about three months ago when it stalled while idling and would not restart.

After about ½ hour it did start and ran fine until two weeks ago. It stalled out and refused to restart for twenty minutes at which time it did the same thing again. I had it towed home and replaced the fuel tank and all the vacuum hoses just behind the fuel tank.

The fuel pump seems to work because in the Haynes manual it says to straight wire it and if it makes noise it is okay. I also replaced the fuel pump relay, fuel filter and Crankshaft Position Sensor. The lines are all tight, and I get no codes from the on board diagnostic Check Engine Soon light except 12 which means no problem.

After all this, it does the exact same thing. Starts up just fine when cold, runs for approximately 18 to twenty minutes then shuts down. While in the shut down mode, I turn on the key and hear the fuel pump sound, but the car refuses to start. If I wait for about 15 minutes it will start up fine and go through the same act.

I have limited experience at diagnostics, and no tools save ratchets etc. I can take the whole car apart and put it back together, but I need some type of idea what may be wrong because I could replace many expensive parts and be in the same boat.

I have no where to turn, as the hick town I live near is full of mechanics who fix one thing and break another to keep from starving. I must fix this and hope you would have some ideas.

Thanks in advance
Dan

A. You need a fuel pressure gauge hooked up to be able to rule out proper fuel pressure as a problem. A scanner would also be a big help to watch all sensors when the problem is there.

Personally, I think it is a bad fuel pump.

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