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Matthew Wright

Five Reasons Your Engine May Be Overheating

By April 29, 2012

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If you have an overheating problem, or if your engine just seems to be running hot, you should check out this quick list of things that can cause your engine to build up excessive heat. It won't solve all of your cooling problems, but knowing the most common overheating causes could help you diagnose your hot engine problem more quickly, and save you money.
Comments
May 2, 2012 at 1:54 am
(1) Auto Repair Mesa says:

Thanks for sharing a useful information. Looking for more update. I would like to share my site with you which is also related to autos visit-
Auto Repair Mesa

May 2, 2012 at 4:57 am
(2) Auto Repair Albuquerque says:

Every customer looks for a trusted auto shop that is able to offer the best services. It can include engine repair, brake repair or any other service which are mostly needed by vehicles. It is very informative blog. Thanks for sharing.Auto Repair Albuquerque

May 2, 2012 at 2:37 pm
(3) car maintenance tip says:

i have no idea about engines until i read the articles and the content of this blog… it is impressive that many people like to share their knowledge…! now i know what are engines and the cause why it overheats sometimes…
thank for sharing… =)

May 2, 2012 at 5:37 pm
(4) cars repair says:

We have had a couple cases of overheating vehicles here in our shop just in the past 2 days. In one instance, the vehicle was actually here for an emissions test, but the technician was unable to continue until the customer decided to take care of the overheat condition. In the other instance, the customer needed a new thermostat and a new radiator cap.

May 8, 2012 at 5:21 pm
(5) allan says:

Many modern vehicles use solid state relays instead of the electro-mechanical ones of the past. The fans they control draw a huge amount of current and the connectors which plug into the solid state felays to power these high current fans fail over time. The connectors get to HOT the pins melt which causes high resistance and finally an open circuit and the fan shuts down. This is so common the dealerships actually sell the connectors to be spliced onto the wiring harness with butt connectors without having to replace the entire harness. This is almost unheard of except that it has become so common the manufacturers had to do something about it. If you have an electric fan problem be SURE to pull off the connector going to the solid state relay and look INSIDE of the connector and smell it(the inside). It will smell burnt and look like charcoal if it is bad. You can’t tell by looking at the outside surface. You MUST pull it OFF and look and smell on the INSIDE.

May 9, 2012 at 10:34 am
(6) John Henry says:

I own a 2001 Nissan Sentra and for the second time in the past four years when I went to check my oil level,the yellow plastic handle that is attached to the dip-stick simply snapped off and then the dip-stick just falls down the tube.It is a real pain in the neck trying to retrieve it and if you are unable to fish it out yourself it will cost you quite a lot with a mechanic or the dealership..To prevent this I reccomend that you remove the dip-stick and find something to cover the hole..Keep your dip-stick in a safe place and use only to check your oil level as needed.It seems that the heat of the engine causes the handle to just break apart.

May 15, 2012 at 2:18 pm
(7) Roger says:

Thank you for your information to keep my care car cool.

May 15, 2012 at 2:24 pm
(8) Bob B. says:

Leave the dipstick in the tube, raise it slightly and snap a retainer on the dipstick shaft, just below the handle. Now the dipstick will be retained in that position even if the handle became detached. When you check the
oil level, just detach the retainer and replace it after the check is made.
As long as the handle remains secure, you can continue with this method.
Buy a new dipstick only when you have to. (Note: The shaft retainer can be any kind of a device that will do the job as outlined—a metal snap clip
if it stays secure; even a clothespin; improvise with anything.

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